Back to School: Ambassador Picks

man wearing vintage denim jeans and nfl rams t shirt outside

BACK TO SCHOOL: AMBASSADOR PICKS

We’ve been fortunate to meet so many of you through our ambassador program, and for those who have worked with us so far, thank you! It’s dope to see how you wear your eclectic Ragstock finds. During this past month, we asked our college-attending ambassadors to create a look or two based on the back-to-school season. Scroll on to see how eight of our BFFs styled some pencil sharpening, book-buying looks and shop our new arrivals here

THE VINTAGE '90s JACKET

Emily has the grunge look down, plain and simple, but always manages to throw in a little something from left field. We love how she layered a flouncy white top under a leopard print 90s jacket, topping the look off with distressed jeans and chunky AF black boots. 

SILK SHIRTS & SIMPLE JEANS

Maximus’ style is what Instagram dreams are made of. between his layered jewelry, on-trend dad shoes and perfectly tucked button-ups, these looks are perfect for back to school in that they are both super cool and put together. Keep the jeans simple like Max to pull all focus towards the sweet silk shirts or vintage button-ups you can find in our stores or online. 

SICK SAD WORLD

Even if she didn’t shoot one of these photos in a literal skate park, we love how Harmony’s look screams ’90s skater kid. Her shirt, combo’d with a pair of baggy camo pants and Chucks (featuring a bonus! mismatched laces!), makes this look one for the books. 

COLLEGE TEE & DAD JEANS

Gabe is for sure 2 cool 4 school, going for an undeniably ’90s dad-inspired look (very of the moment, no?) with a #sports t-shirt tucked into cuffed medium-wash denim that’s cinched with a thick leather belt. He adds the right sneakers, sunglasses, and chain to modernize the look. 10/10. 

COORDINATING ACCESSORIES

We’re v into the way that Taylor put together both of these autumnal looks. By adding a black baseball cap and Adidas windbreaker to her first outfit, she added visual interest and broke up a standard waistline. In her second, we love the way that she coordinated her sunglasses with the coziest turtleneck ever (in stores only). 

A LITTLE GRUNGE

Aysiah styles our idiot tee to a T by layering it under one of our plaid tunics. We love the super wide belt and dainty accessories, not to mention the brainy background!

BACK TO BASICS

As you’ve maybe heard, corduroy remains as one of this season’s biggest trends. We love the way that Wade kept the look cool and casual by pairing a pair of our men’s corduroy shorts with a plain long-sleeved tee. Tucked in? Tucked out? The possibilities are pretty much limitless. 

CLASSIC PATTERNS

Clarice captured the ‘back to school’ vibe like a pro with separates pretty much made for the month of September. Our cherub tee (trending!) looks great when layered under a cool-toned women’s flannel and dainty necklace. In her second look, a cropped mustard-colored tee takes center stage, accessories with the cutest mini backpack and white trainers. Who else is excited to study!?

Meet Our Ambassadors

Meet Our Ambassadors

Meet our first official brand ambassadors! They’re the coolest of the cool and here to represent the wide range of interests, tastes, and style that make up our brand. Want to join? Learn more about our ambassador program here

How would you describe your style?

“Personal style is all about self expression. My style is how I speak without saying a word, always changing, and does not conform to standards.”

Minneapolis, MN

What’s your favorite piece of clothing?

“I love love love to wear a bodysuit. I know bodysuits are mostly made for women, but i have found so many that look really good on me (all from Ragstock). You just have to find the right style.”

Jackson, MI

If you had to pick one, which decade would you choose to live in and why?

The 90s aesthetic is EVERYTHING! Plus, Prince is my all time favorite artist so I would LOVE to be alive at the height of his popularity. And also the wacky sweaters of this era are absolutely brilliant. I still have yet to find a really good one like one with sunny side up eggs or a train or a teddy bear, but I’m not giving up!!!!

Cleveland, OH

How would you describe your style?

“I would describe my style as edgy, classic, and ever evolving! As I grow older my style continues to change as I do. But I always like to keep my style fresh.”

Lansing, MI

What do you spend most of your time doing?

“When I’m not at work, I am practicing my makeup skills for the gram! I love the way makeup makes me feel confident, and how creative I get when I’m holding a brush.”

Minneapolis, MN

What do you like most about Ragstock?

“…The options, like come on. I can go to Ragstock to get overalls, my perfect Halloween costume, some colorful spandex if I am feeling frisky or some crazy pair of sunglasses. They have so many cool and different pieces which is very refreshing.”

New York

If you had to pick one, which decade would you choose to live in and why?

“I would live in the ’50s so that it would be acceptable to wear a statement dress to work everyday.”

San Antonio, TX

How would you describe your style?

“…Growing up in Texas, I’ve learned to appreciate the old western style and it’s simple, relaxed look. The clothes is also breathable enough to wear during the summer months which is important since it gets so hot!”

Kansas City, MO

What’s your favorite piece of clothing?

“My adidas sweatpants.”

Omaha, NE

If you had to pick one, which decade would you choose to live in and why?

“The 1990s. Everyone’s style was unapologetic, and being an outcast was in. I’d love to live there and create my own brand. Inspiration was everywhere, and people were celebrated for being different.”

Fort Collins, CO

How would you describe your style?

Making a statement is super important to me. If I’m not turning heads, what’s the point?

Calumet City, IL

How would you describe your style?

“I would describe my style as casual, retro, and chic. I love being comfortable and looking good while doing it. Since I spend most of my time dancing I like to find ways to be comfortable, free, and stylish.”

Chicago, IL

What do you like most about Ragstock?

“I really like the vintage clothing and vibe that Ragstock has. Finding clothes that feels authentically vintage can be difficult to come across, but with Ragstock it has become way more easier for me to find what I am looking for.”

Chicago, IL

How would you describe your style?

“Casual with a little bit of edge.”

Champaign, IL

What do you like most about Ragstock?

“I love that Ragstock have everything I’m looking for. I can walk into Ragstock and find 1 or even 2 outfits that fits my style every time visit. I especially love the vintage 80s sweaters section in the fall/winter.”

Milwaukee, WI

How would you describe your style?

“A little grunge-y and a little girly.”

What do you spend most of your time doing?

“I love taking pictures with my film camera when I’m out with friends or exploring new places! I’m also an avid foodie and love trying street foods, currently on the hunt for the best street tacos in America. And when I have to go to work, I’m so happy that I get to live out my dream as a full-time actor!”

Chicago, IL

How would you describe your style?

“My style bounces between preppy 80s child, boho surfer girl chic, and trendy city kid influenced by streetwear—I can never pick one style to stick with so I often find myself mixing different aspects from different aesthetics that I think look good. I like to wear things that make me happy, so that means putting on outfits that I feel good in. Also lots of yellow.”

Omaha, NE

What do you like most about Ragstock?

“I like the variety of clothes Ragstock has! You can choose what look you’re going for. It’s the perfect place to build your style and find who you are and how to express yourself. Ragstock has EVERYTHING!”

Northfield, MN

What do you spend most of your time doing?

“I write a lot, I’m a student poet and creative writer, but I also enjoy listening to music, finding new artists, and picking out new pieces or fashion!”

Madison, WI

What’s your favorite piece of clothing?

“This is ever changing but right now I really love overalls and silk or satin skirts.”

Livonia, MI

What’s your favorite piece of clothing?

“My favorite piece of clothing is my vintage Nike windbreaker. I can wear with friends on a night out or I can spend a night in on the couch in it.”

Medellín, Col

What do you like most about Ragstock?

“What I like most about Ragstock is that you can go from one big fashion era to another in seconds, which means you can play with your outfits and match them in so many ways, even between new clothes and recycled clothes.”

Sioux Fall, SD

What do you spend most of your time doing?

“I am an aspiring doer of everything! I spend most of my time working on my business, helping my family business or TRAVELING. I’ve been to 33 countries (ask me my top 5) I also am a writer and a blogger.”

Chicago, IL

What’s your favorite piece of clothing?

“Silk Picasso-esque scarf I bought for 2 dollars at Mt. Sinai Resale shop, a thrift store benefitting Mt. Sinai Health Systems. I may have grabbed it out of the hands of a customer while I was volunteering… I don’t believe in robbing seniors, but it’s okay, she’s a friend.”

What do you spend most of your time doing?

“I spend most of my time listening to music and attending music festivals!!”

Ann Arbor, MI

St. Paul, MN

Ann Arbor, MI

Where the Well-Dressed Goblins Shop

— 1979 —

bottelson-mckay-star-tribune-2

“Where the Well-Dressed Goblins Shop”

By Robert T. Smith, Minneapolis Star Staff Writer

Monday, October 29, 1979

For about $6 you can be an Arab sheik or a French Foreign Legionnaire—or even Dracula.

For about that price you could go as a Gay Nineties beauty—male or female—or you could create, as the old Scottish prayer says: Some “ghoulies and ghosties and longleggety beasties and things that go bump in the night . . . “

And you can do all this at the Minneapolis Rag Stock Co., 909 S. 2nd St.

It’s a big old barnlike place run by Howard Weisskopf. About this time each year for the past eight years it has been swamped with folks who want Halloween costumes and who want to do their own thing in those terms.

Weisskopf has imported used capes, worn by London bobbies, and those turretlike caps used by French legionnaires. They are not replicas but the actual used items. You could be Jack the Ripper or perhaps Geau Geste.

He also has an assortment of used formal wear, tuxedoes and the like that were in the rental spots too long.

So you get a black tux and a black bobbie cape and, viola! Dracula.



howard-weisskopf-star-tribune

It all happened in a way by accident. And it happened because Weisskopf wanted to do something for his customers about Halloween time eight years ago.

There was a fruit company across the street from the store, at a different location then.

I decided to buy a few boxes of apples and give them away, mainly to the kids, at Halloween time,” said Weisskopf. “I had to quit that because now it would take a carload of apples.”

Weisskopf is not getting rich at it. His entire retail business is only 5 percent of the gross. Mostly he buys and sells rags and old clothes for recycling.

But that doesn’t bring you into contact with the public, especially the young. And Weisskopf got kinda lonely.

In the beginning, shortly before the end of World War II, Weisskopf was an army quartermaster. His job at that time was to check in clothing and other supplies of soldiers who were being discharged.

He began to wonder what would happen to all those used things. He figured they woujld need someone to take it off the army’s hands. He became that someone in 1946 and has been at it since.

About 13 years ago he decided to go retail. He got into Halloween eight years ago.

Weisskopf travels the world looking for stuff to sell. In London he ran across the bobbies’ capes. In West Germany he found a bunch of used German army marching boots.

“It all happened in a way by accident. And it happened because Weisskopf wanted to do something for his customers about Halloween time eight years ago.”

“I bought 1,400 pairs of snowshoes in London that were to be worn with the reinvasion of Europe,” said Weisskopf. “They belong to Allied paratroopers.” He brought them back not long ago and so far has sold 1,300 pairs. “They’re sort of like collectors’ items.”

Then there are the usual barrels and racks of dresses, trousers and hundreds of other items made of cloth.

“At first the Halloween costume hunters were just the young,” said Weisskopf. “Now people in their 30s and 40s are coming in.”

The big deal is that people, for a very low price, can do their own fantasizing. As Weisskopf put it, “They can become their own Yves St. Laurent. Take that girl over there looking at that fur coat. She’ll probably make a skirt out of it.”

That girl over there wouldn’t say.

But David Clements, 26, Rosemount, and his wife, Barbara, and their two children were definitely there for Halloween.

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“I want to be a pirate, but my own kind of pirate,” said Clements as he rummaged through some clothes. “The only ruffled shirt I could find was a woman’s, but I bought it anyway.”

Douglas Brophy, 21, Minneapolis, decided he would go to his party as an Arab sheik. He picked out what looked like an exotic tablecloth, and wrapped it around his head. Yeah, a sheik.

Said Lindy Theroult, 18, Minneapolis: “They say you have to use your imagination when you come here, so here I am imagining.”

Val McKay, 20, and Cyndy Bottelson, both of St. Paul, said they were going to the same party. They picked out a couple of dresses that looked like the 1920s, the flapper era.

Why do they like it at Rag Stock?

” ‘Cause it’s kinky,” said McKay.

And what are they going to their party as?

“Nerds,” said McKay. What’s a nerd? “A weird person.” OK, that’s Halloween.

Ordinary dresses run from $1.50 to $2. A really formal job is $3. For that same price you can buy a French legionnaire’s hat. For about $15 you can buy male formal wear, the works.

You can even buy a used tux for your kid, for about $5.

But after talking with the people jamming the place, you get the impression they are not there so much to save money as to create their own monsters.

“They say you have to use your imagination when you come here, so here I am imagining.”

– Lindy Theroult, 18, Minneapolis

Smith, R. (1979, October 29). Where the Well-Dressed Goblins Shop. The Minneapolis Star. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/

Rag Stock—a Funky-Fashion Find

— 1977 —

"Rag Stock—a Funky-Fashion Find"

By Monty Norris, Minneapolis Star Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 4th, 1977

This is a rags-to-riches story with a new twist.

In this case the hero still is in rags and he isn’t necessarily very rich, but that’s not the point. The point is simply what he’s doing with all those rags. For example, are you in the market for an Italian army duffel bag? Or maybe a London bobby’s cape? How about an English fireman’s jacket or some colorful Java print cloth?

Those are just a few of the offbeat items for sale at the Minneapolis Rag Stock Co., 824 4th Ave. S.—a place its owner, Howard Weisskopf, says “has become an institution in this city.” Maybe he’s right. Rag Stock, to the uninitiated, is the city’s largest used-clothing mart—a center for funky fashion.

“I don’t know, frankly, what I’d do if there wasn’t someplace like this,” a mother of two toddlers said as she rummaged through a barrel of used shirts. “I’ve been buying most of our clothes here now for the past two or three years.”

“It’s just fun to come in here and look around,” said one out-of-town coed, who said she and several of her friends drive into the Twin Cities frequently to shop at Rag Stock.

"Rag Stock, to the uninitiated, is the city's largest used-clothing mart—a center for funky fashion."

The store also is a favorite shopping mart for theatrical types looking for costumes. Dudley Riggs himself is a regular browser and William Semans, the Cricket Theatre director and operator, said, “Yeah, I usually write about a check a month to Rag Stock for costumes. They’ve got a vast collection of things to pick from.”

Laraine Lee, the Cricket’s costumer, says Rag Stock is a bargain paradise.

“You can find things there that you don’t find other places,” she said. “We found some British capes there we used in a recent production. I even bought one of their British firemen’s jackets for myself. It’s a terrific place to shop. It’s a lot of fun.”

Weisskopf, 55, sees himself as more than a used-clothing clothing mogul, however. He considers himself something of a worldwide fashion trend-setter. And he makes a pretty good case.

“A few years ago I was in London on a business trip,” Weisskopf said. “I wanted to unload a bunch of bowling shirts and college sweatshirts I had. We had a bunch of them and they were selling pretty well here, but we had so many. So I conned this London boutique dealer on King’s Rd. in Chelsea into buying them. I told him they were really big back in the U.S. Actually, the only place I knew for sure they were popular was in Minneapolis. But I figured they’d go over big other places, too.

“If they start selling stuff in the boutiques along King’s Rd., then it’s stylish, it’s fashionable. And that’s what happened.

“Before long, you had these English kids running around with bowling shirts from Anoka and Coon Rapids, places like that. And then pretty soon kinds from the continent were coming over (to England) to buy them and soon it was the style all over Europe, too.”

Weisskopf doesn’t claim credit for the used clothing fad that burgeoned in the late 60s. He just capitalized on it, in a sense, and helped nurture it in this region.”I was available to fill a need,” he said.

The store’s beginning, however, was sheer happenstance.It started with a phone call.

"Before long, you had these English kids running around with bowling shirts from Anoka and Coon Rapids, places like that."
- Howard Weisskopf

“About 9 or 10 years ago, back when we were on Quincy St., someone from the county welfare department called and asked if they sent someone over would we sell them some used clothing. Back then, of course, we did nothing but process old clothes for industrial use as rags and ship them overseas for the poor—stuff like that.

“Well, I told them sure, of course I would. And that’s how it happened. Word spread, I guess, that this was a great place to find old clothes.

“That was about the time of the ‘hippie era’ and these kids started coming in looking for things like military jackets and used jeans and stuff like that.

“It got comical at times. Employees would stop work and watch the kids rummaging through the clothes. Productivity went thataway. . . . ” Weisskopf gave a thumbs down gesture and smiled. “Finally, I decided to open a small retail operation, selling some of the better items.”

The retail store is only a small part of the total operation. Rag Stock also ships clothing to Europe and several African nations where it is either distributed to the poor or the material is recycled into new clothing and blankets.

But it is the retail operation that has made Weisskopf something of a local celebrity.

“Everywhere I go in the Twin Cities people are always saying, ‘Oh, you own Rag Stock, huh. Gee, my kids shop there all the time.'”

“We’re starting to see more families in here these days,” he said. “It’s probably partly because of the economy and partly that used clothing is simply more fashionable these days.”This is kinda like a kid’s toy bin,” he said. “It’s a fun place just to play. We don’t have sales clerks hanging around customers. People can just relax and enjoy themselves.”

Weisskopf likes to wax philosophical at times. And he walks on the edge of both hype and hyperbole when doing it, too. But you get the feeling he knows just what he’s saying. To wit:

“Kids and young people who are buying clothes like this are setting the fashion around the world.”

“Today’s kids and young people are more realistic and functional than their parents’ generation. They realize you don’t have to go to expensive department stores to buy clothes.”

Weisskopf rounds up most of the clothing form various institutions in the upper Midwest, such as the Salvation Army, Goodwill, government surplus supplies, churches and other charitable groups.

“Buying clothes from these places is a major source of revenue to them,” Weisskopf said. “People may be alarmed when they hear that these places are selling clothes to us. But they have to realize that these places can’t handle all the clothes they get and they have to have buyers like us.”

Weisskopf and his son-in-law, Marc Leurs, administrative manager for the company, say that the popularity of faded blue jeans and denims has made them increasingly scarce.

“They’re still our main drawing card,” Luers said. “But they’re getting harder and harder to find. They don’t come through normal channels much anymore. We have to really hunt to find them.

“We’ve had to start buying them and bib overalls from other sources in the last couple of years.”

Nevertheless, the company maintains a large supply of jeans and denims, which Luers and Weisskopf say still are their biggest sellers.

"Kids and young people who are buying clothes like this are setting the fashion around the world."
- Howard Weisskopf

Norris, M. (1977, January 4). Ragstock—a Funky-Fashion Find. The Star Tribune. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/

Help

Founded in the mid-’50s, Ragstock began as a place where you could find second-hand clothing from a faraway land, hand-picked by our founder, Howard Weisskopf, as he traveled the world in search of unique items. In the next few decades, his flagship store would expand to cities throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, and more. Now, with thirty-six locations across the Midwest and two new shops in Austin, Texas, we’re proud to continue our business of presenting a curated selection of vintage and recycled clothes.

Over time, we’ve also begun to sell a growing amount of new clothing. Our small team of buyers travels to LA and NYC to find the best affordable trends for both men and women. You’ll be able to find new items in stores and online every week!

Vintage Vicodin Fanny Pack

Drugs are BAD! But 90s fanny packs are RAD!

– Belt length: 40″ (Adjustable)
– Pouch size: 8″ x 5″ x 4″

Bad Decisions Club Dad Hat

Content + Care
– 100% Cotton
– Hand Wash
– Imported

 

Size + Fit
– One Size Fits All with adjustable strap

Don’t Be A Dick Socks

Content + Care
– 70% Cotton, 28% Polyester, 2% Elastic
– Machine wash

Size + Fit
– Unisex
– One size fits most
– Men 6-11
– Women 7.5-12

Used Merchandise: Secondhand Stores Cater to Variety of Clients

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“Used Merchandise: Secondhand Stores Cater to Variety of Clients”

By Liz Fedor, Daily Times Reporter Intern

Tuesday, July 10, 1979

College students, housewives, blue-collar workers and wealthy people all have something in common. They are flocking to secondhand stores to build their wardrobes and furnish their homes.

Money savings are convincing many people to cancel trips to high-priced retail stores and make the circuit of downtown St. Cloud used merchandise stores: Minneapolis Rag Stock, The Next to New Shoppe, the Salvation Army Store and the Society for the Propagation of the Faith Auxiliary Store.

Minneapolis Rag Stock, 512 Mall Germain, a surplus and salvage clothing store, carries a full line of jeans, military surplus, and natural fibers. Rag Stock caters to clients from 8 to 80 years old, according to manager Nancy Triebel.

Jeans are the hottest selling items at $1.98 for used jeans and $8.34 for new, prewashed jeans. New clothing that the stores carry is from factory returns, slightly irregular or have been acquired through close-out sales, Triebel said.

Originally, the store was geared to college students, Triebel said, but farmers came in to buy coveralls, mothers to outfit their children and middle and upper-income people to buy European imports.

The store carries a line of 100 percent wool, cotton, and raw silk blazers, skirts and slacks that were made in the 1940s and 1950s. They are in demand because they are made from quality material and have quality workmanship. A 100 percent wool, serge, or gabardine blazer costs about $6 and a skirt about $2 to $4, Triebel said.

Among other items the stores carries are World War II German marching boots at $7 from World War II and French Foreign Legion hats at $7.25, she said.

Triebel predicts rag stock stores will become more popular if they can meet consumer demands, as clothing prices increase and quality declines. People are tired of paying high prices for new clothing, she said, and are learning to recycle.

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Fedor, L. (1979, July 10). Used Merchandise: Secondhand Stores Cater to Variety of Clients. St. Cloud Times (Saint Cloud, Minnesota). Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/

Oy To The World Hoodie

Content + Care
– 60% Cotton, 40% Polyester
– Machine wash
– Imported

 

Size + Fit
– Model is 5’9″ wearing size small
– Measurements taken from product laying flat
– Size small: Chest: 18″ Length: 25″
– Size medium: Chest: 19.5″ Length: 25″
– Size large: Chest: 21″ Length: 25″

Vintage World Series Sweatshirt

This sweatshirt is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Walt Disney World Sweatshirt

Walt Disney World Sweatshirt

This piece is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Divers World Tee

Size and condition notes: there are heavy, dark stains on the front and lower back.

Walt Disney World Tee

Size and condition notes: actual size is unknown because the original tag is missing or unreadable. Size has been estimated based on the measurements. There are some black marks on the back collar.

World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

Tan World Passport Jacket

Size and condition notes: actual size listed on the tag is Mens Large. There is a small stain spot on the right shoulder.

Disney World Hoodie

This sweatshirt is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

Old World Bomber Jacket

This piece is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Epcot World Showcase Hoodie

Size and condition notes: the size tag is missing, size is estimated using the width. This hoodie has a few light stains.

World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

Walt Disney World Hoodie

Size and condition notes: the drawstrings are frayed and there are faint stains on the sleeves.

World Tour Minnesota Sweatshirt

This sweatshirt is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Black World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

The Retro Look: Second-Hand Fashion Goes Uptown

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“The Retro Look: Second-Hand Fashion Goes Uptown”

By Steve Berg, Minneapolis Tribune Staff Writer

Friday, April 27, 1979

As they say, Andrea Williams looked like a million bucks.

She wore a fashionable navy-blue pinstriped jacket with padded shoulders; a white shirt with a narrow collar, the same kind they’re showing in all the designer boutiques; a scarlet sweater-vest; black suspenders; khaki slacks, cuffed and straight-legged; and an elegant pair of black and white saddle oxfords. It as truly a striking ensemble, especially considering Williams, a Minneapolis commercial artist, paid less than $6 for the whole works.

She is one of a growing community of people here and across the country who are buying their clothes, almost all of them, from second-hand stores. “I’d guess that 90 percent of my wardrobe is made up of, you know, clothing that has been worn before,” she said.

In the late ’60s and early ’70s, young, ragged students frequented the second-hand stores, snapping up army surplus field jackets and other old military items as an anti-war statement. By the mid-’70s, artists, actors and the more stylized segments of the gay and black communities—those people usually on the edge of new fashion consciousness—discovered second-hand clothing, first as a “camp” statement and later as a legitimate style. Now a much wider spectrum of folks, mostly young professionals who prefer inner city living, are flocking to second-hand clothing, stuff that in many circles has ceased to be “rags” and is now referred to as “recycled” or “vintage” or “antique” clothing. Or classier yet, The Retro Look.

Retro is a combination of ’40s and ’50s styles. Some feminists have interpreted Retro as “reactionary” fashion, a return to the padded shoulders, tiny waists, slit skirts and the sexy “hurt me” facial expressions of the Marilyn Monroe ’50s. Retro clothing (both new and second-hand) goes for big money at the designer boutiques, but some—Williams among them—are convinced that The Look can be achieved without large cash outlays.

Williams calls what she does “junking,” although many Retro-look partisans would take offense at that, preferring a more refined description. On weekends she spends hours picking through the bins and flipping through the racks at her favorite haunts, some of which she refuses to reveal. Junkers are that way.

“It’s a race between us and some of the fancier second-hand stores to see who can score the best stuff at the best prices,” she said. “One day I bought 30 ties (those nice narrow ones), two shirts and a vest for 65 cents. Next time I came back, all the ties were gone. Somebody from one of those fancier stores had probably come in and cleaned the place out.”

Williams, who is in her 30s, gets ideas for what she calls her “items” by looking at the Italian edition of Vogue magazine. “It’s more outrageous than the French Vogue,” she said. “The things you see in there are going to be fashionable here in two or three years. And the only places you can buy these things are the junk places.”

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In that way, many of those who by at second-hand shops feel they are teetering on the cutting edge of high fashion without paying high prices. Williams’ pinstripe and khaki ensemble, for example: $2 for the jacket, 50 cents for the shirt, a dime for the vest, $2 for the pants, a quarter for the suspenders and $1 for the shoes. “My socks,” she said with raised eyebrows, “are new.”

Still, that’s 5.95 for the outfit. Most of the clothing was originally menswear and needed cleaning and extensive alteration, costs which might double or even triple the original raw price. Still, Williams said, it was hundreds of dollars less than she would have paid at a boutique or a high fashion department store.

“Also you can’t forget,” she said, “that the construction of these clothes is much better. The fabrics are better, the wools and the cottons and the gabardines. I have a gray cashmere coat I bought at a junk sale for $5 that I like much better than a coat I bought new for $200.”

“The quality of clothes has definitely gone downhill since the early 1960s,” said Leslie Meier of Minneapolis, another enthusiastic second-hand buyer.

The new generation of second-hand buyers also believes that buying used clothing is simply more fun than buying new. “You get to know that stores,” Williams said, “you get to know who is strong on ties, who is strong on sweaters.” Faithful trashers also visit their favorite spots often, hoping to get in on new shipments and building a certain rapport with the clerks. Also, stores tend to move around a lot, and it’s important for a good second-hand freak to stay au courant.

Williams has definite tips on junking etiquette: “A lot of people would be appalled at some of the places I go into. Some of them are pretty grubby. A lot depends on how you look when you walk in. You get real humble. You don’t look like somebody who owns the place. You do a little rap first. Tell them what you want and they’ll get real excited if you find something. Establish a little rapport. It’s important.”

Many of those who buy used clothing to be fashionable—not just to make ends meet—approach the experience with a certain sense of humor, a certain attitude that vacillates between camp and practicality, an attitude that seems deeply rooted in nostalgia.

“The relation of Camp taste to the past is extremely sentimental,” Susan Sontag wrote in a 1964 essay “Notes on Camp.” Camp fashion means living your life as if it were theater, she wrote. And in talking to second-hand fashion buffs, you do get the impression they believe they are putting something over on someone. Perhaps they are.

At a place on Lake Street called “The Trashing Machine,” Williams admired a bizarre earring and brooch set that looks as if it came from the tackle box of a fly fisherman. “Quite an interesting item!” she said with a wry smile, well aware that she could have pulled off actually wearing the pieces and wearing them well.

The days of the dirt-cheap second-hand wardrobe are, of course, coming to an end. The more attention used clothing gets in the media, the more popular it becomes. The more demand, the more scarce truly fine items become and the more expensive they get. Good, cheap second-hand stock has become extremely rare on both coats, and even in the Midwest, wholesale buyers are having to go farther into the country to buy good items for low prices at estate sales or, more traditionally, get them for free from charity drives.

A new hierarchy has developed among the stores which have, by choice, divided themselves into at least three tiers: (1) The traditional, large-volume warehouse outlets where the shopper rummages through bins and where a top-of-the-line sport coat might cost $5; (2) the medium range thrift stores where items are sometimes cleaned and pressed and hanging on racks and where a nice jacket might go for $10 or $15, and (3) the vintage or antique clothing boutiques, many of which specialize in fine used clothing from a particular era and where a typical jacket might run $40 to $60.

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The catchy names of some of the stores reflect the changing attitude toward used clothes. Elite Repeat and Norma’s Encore Shop in St. Paul; Rag Stock in downtown Minneapolis and Dinkytown; and Fagin and Me, Jeepers Creepers, One more Tyme, The Trashing Machine and The Switching Post, all in south Minneapolis. At last count, there were probably 30 such stores in the Twin Cities, some much less visible than others.

Howard Weisskopf who owns seven stores in Minnesota and Wisconsin including Minneapolis Rag Stock Inc. is one of the city’s biggest second-hand dealers. He calls his stock recycled clothing and believes it has gained respectability partly because of style and cost and partly because more people are interested in the preservation of old things, even clothes.

“the kids are looking for the salt-and-pepper sport jackets with narrow lapels from the ’50s,” he said, “and they want shirts with small collars or button-downs—very big—and vests are a must. They want those alpaca golf sweaters, gabardine pants and rayon sport shirts. The girls buy old slips and wear the top part for formal things . . . This stuff is being ripped off in the fashion world today more than anything else. I’d say the kids are leading the designers. I guarantee you, two years from now you’ll see this stuff in Justers.”

Weisskopf was saying that fashion is cyclical. The big second-hand sellers from the ’40s and ’50s are very similar to the designer clothing being sold for big money today. He traces the second-hand fashion movement back to the mid 1960s when, he says, “kids literally went around in rags.”

“What I call the flower children were doing anything to upset the establishment,” he said. “Now recycling something is looked on the same way as God, the flag and motherhood. It used to be that you looked both ways before you went into a Salvation Army. Now you see all kinds of people in there.”

If Weisskopf represents volume, Linda McHale represents the “upper end” in the second-hand clothes business. Her shop, “The Corner Store, which recently moved from Franklin Ave. to Lake St., specializes in stock from the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s. “I won’t buy ’60s stuff,” she said. Her merchandise is all cleaned and pressed and looks like what it is—a quite carefully selected group of antique or vintage clothing.

McHale keeps up by reading all the latest fashion magazines. It all turns over about every 30 years,” she said. Our women customers are still mostly into ’40s clothing. The men are already into the ’50s.”

 

Berg, S. (1979, April 27). The Retro Look: Second-Hand Fashion Goes Uptown. The Star Tribune. Retrieved from https://startribune.newspapers.com/

Black World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

Twins World Series Champions Sweatshirt

Twins World Series Champions Sweatshirt

This piece is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Walt Disney World Vintage Sweatshirt

Walt Disney World Vintage Sweatshirt

This sweatshirt is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

Pooh Bear Disney World Sweatshirt

This sweatshirt is a Ragstock recycled item. It is a one-of-a-kind piece in original vintage condition. Handpicked from our assortment of vintage clothing, only one of each is available.

4 Modern Ways to Wear a Vintage Dress

4 Modern Ways to Wear a Vintage Dress

The world of vintage dresses stretches wide—some of us hunt for the presence of colossal shoulder pads while others look for the kick of an ’80s ruffle or a good ‘n’ loud floral pattern. Over the past year, we’ve built our vintage dress section online to include an ever-increasing selection of vintage dresses, with most dating from the ’70s-’90s. 

While lots of us can stand back and admire a good vintage dress in all of ruffled, floraled glory, it can be hard to picture how one would actually go about wearing these numbers to anything besides an ’80s theme party or literal Halloween. Enter, this small but mighty blog post; here to show you four good ways to style your vintage dress and enter the coming decade in style. 

Neutrals with a Pastel Pop

Have a dress with some quintessential ’80s flair, including pastel colors, loud floral prints, or ruffles? Start by throwing on a pair of coordinating shades (like our Ombre Cat Eye Sunglasses). Okay, do you now feel like Easter? Never fear—add a classic trench coat in a neutral camel color (black, grey, or navy also work) to tone down your look and add a bit of contrasting structure.  

Amp up the '80s (With a Twist!)

A short, flounced, floral dress has the 1980s written all over it, doesn’t it? While you could work to counter the over-the-top nature of the dress with a sleek coat or boots, another route is taking it up a notch instead. Throw on a denim jacket, add some chunky boots, and top it off with a baseball cap—a sporty detail to give the outfit a bit of a twist. 

Be a Bit Mysterious

A straight cut, lightly-patterned vintage house dress is given a completely different persona when worn under a billowing, heavy leather trench coat—sorta like I Love Lucy crossed with The Matrix. Throw on a pair of large, coordinating aviators and strut down the street in style. 

Colors on Colors

Sometimes you’ll find a vintage romper or jumpsuit in our dresses category! Take a super summer-y number like this and transition it to cooler seasons by adding a vintage lightweight jacket and a beanie. The super coordinated colors add to the vintage vibe! 

The Sweater Store

TheSweaterStore.com was created in 2011 as a dedicated website for Ragstock’s world-class selection of vintage ugly Christmas sweaters. At its peak in 2012, the site offered over 25,000 unique sweaters. In 2017, TheSweaterStore.com was merged into Ragstock.com’s ugly Christmas sweater category.

Dad’s Rootbeer Jacket

Is this an 80s jacket or a 90s jacket? That’s debatable. Regardless of the decade it came from, this vintage windbreaker is pretty sweet. It really is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Tag size is listed for your convenience. But the people who made 80s jacket and 90s jackets were obviously crazy, so their sizing might not be comparable to what you’re accustomed to.

Rags Bring Riches, Growth for Pre-Owned Clothing Firm

— 1982 —

“Rags Bring Riches, Growth for Pre-Owned Clothing Firm”

By Tom Davies, Minneapolis Star Tribune Staff Writer

Tuesday, February 2, 1982

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Hard times do not mean the end of rags-to-riches stories. Or, in this case, riches-from-rags stories:

Minneapolis Rag Stock Co. announced Monday the opening of its 11th and 12th stores.

In the last year and a half the Minneapolis merchandiser of used clothing has grown from seven stores to a dozen, and it hopes to open as many as three more stores this year.

But Michael Finn, retail sales director, refuses to give the frayed economy much credit for the firm’s growth.



Rag Stock customers, he said, haven’t changed much: They’re still college-age people, from students to punkers. At the Minneapolis store yesterday there didn’t appear to be any rush of middle-aged suburbanites trying on used band uniforms or army jackets.

“I don’t know if it’s necessarily true that (the economy) has helped us,” Finn said. “Our clientele is dependent on jobs, and when times are hard there are fewer part-time jobs.

“Even the people going to school and being supported by their parents have less money to spend,” he added.

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But the firm does appear to be looking for new customers: Last weekend it opened its first suburban store, at 8913 Penn Av. S. in Bloomington.

“Normally our locations are near college campuses,” Finn said. “And though the Bloomington store isn’t on campus, there are a lot of high schools and Normandale Community College is nearby.”

“But we’ll be watching the Bloomington store closely,” he said.

Since Howard Weisskopf founded the firm in 1946 (incorporating in 1954) Rag Stock has had but one store fold. That was one in La Cross, Wis., that failed a couple of years ago.

“That was not in what you would call a prime location,” Finn explained.

Part of the reason for Rag Stock’s success is that the firm appears to know its market: Of the 12 stores, 11 are close to colleges.

There are stores in Iowa City, near the University of Iowa; in Madison, near the University of Wisconsin; in Eau Claire, near the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; in River Falls, near the University of River Falls; in Menomonie, near the University of Wisconsin-Stout; in Mankato, Minn., near Mankato State University; in St. Cloud, Minn., near St. Cloud State University and St. John’s University, and in Northfield, Minn., near Carleton and St. Olaf colleges.

There’s one more store in a college town, the farthest afield from Rag Stock’s Minneapolis home: In Normal, Ill., home of Northern Illinois University.

“Hard times do not mean the end of rags-to-riches stories. Or, in this case, riches-from-rags stories.”

Finn said he, Weisskopf and the firm’s accountant sit down regularly to discuss growth—”to find out what we can afford to do.”

Though the Bloomington store represents a move into suburbia, Finn said Rag Stock is still looking at its bread and butter, college cities.

“When we drop in to see one of our (outstate) stores we often take a look at other locations,” he said.

And, though Rag Stock is stocking considerably more stores than it did two years ago, Finn said it has little trouble keeping up with the low price needs of its clientele.

“The only thing we’ve had trouble getting is used Hawaiian print shirts,” he said.

Davies, T. (1982, February 2). Rags Bring Riches, Growth for Pre-Owned Clothing Firm. The Minneapolis Star. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/

90s Jacket 17656

Size and condition notes: The silk along the elastic is thinning and developing holes.

Get to Know: Ryen

GET TO KNOW:

RYENlogo

Meet Ryen, a Chicago-based musician with an eclectic sense of style and quickly-growing collection of heartfelt songs. We first noticed him in a photo surrounded by balloons—by chance, a pretty solid visual for the uplifting music he creates. Read on to get a taste of his artistic process, wardrobe, and what we can expect from him in the future.
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All photos by @luiisrtz

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What is your name, where you are from, and what do you do?
My name is RYEN, I’m originally from Humboldt Park in Chicago. I moved to Berwyn (West suburb near Chicago) when I was 13. Moving to Berwyn was a big change for me, it’s where I experienced a different quality of life compared to my upbringing. It also happens to be where I found my inspiration for creating music.
When did music become a part of your life? 🎵
I’ve always been interested in music since I was a young kid. I used to sing in front of my grandmother’s mirror in the living room and rehearse Ricky Martin and NSYNC dance moves like it was my job. I started creating my own music when I was 17 years old and gradually turned it into a career. I could never picture myself doing anything else!

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How would you describe your music style?
Ah, I knew I would get this! One of the most challenging issues I face is HAVING to pick a genre when I’m uploading music. I would describe my music style by a term, not by a genre. The term I can describe it with is “energy”. When you listen to my music (either an uplifting or emotional record) you can feel the energy I carry. When I’m creating music I don’t think to myself “I’m going to make this an R&B song” or “I’m going to give this a tropical vibe”. I just create and let the inspiration flow.
How about your fashion style?
I would say my fashion style is very nonchalant yet clean, flavorful, and comfy at the same time. I enjoy wearing eccentric accessories like my white clout goggles. I also enjoy wearing unknown brands like my uncle’s tees from the ’90s (FIRE). I do like having nice things, but I’m not materialistic by any means. Thrifting is where I happen to find my favorite pieces. As far as footwear goes, my favorite brand would have to be Puma. Specifically the Suede line. I own roughly 10 pairs and they’re definitely my go-to for performances.

“One of the most challenging issues I face is HAVING to pick a genre when I’m uploading music.”

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Give us a breakdown of your style as a five, ten, fifteen, and twenty-three-year-old:
5 years old: Jordan Jumpsuit with matching retro Air Jordan shoes.

10 years old: Plaid button-ups from Gap, Rocawear jean shorts (please forgive me lol) and G-Unit shoes. Fire.

15 years old: Old Navy polos, Levi’s boot cut jeans and clean Air Force 1s

23 years old: Ragstock denim jacket or windbreaker, any comfortable hoodie, skinnys, and Pumas; S/O Rudolf Dassler!
Tell us about your photographer, @luiisrtz!
LEGEND. To say the least. Luis is a very important factor in my brand and the influence I have on my fans; he makes my music come to life visually so PLEASE give him a follow on Instagram! We just started working together in January of 2018, and the synergy couldn’t be better. He’s become one of my closest friends in the process. Most importantly, I believe in his creativity as I do mine.

“I used to sing in front of my grandmother’s mirror in the living room and rehearse Ricky Martin and NSYNC dance moves like it was my job.”

RYEN-10

What’s the last song you released?
The last song I released is a song titled ‘Contigo’. This release is very special to me, it’s the first song that I release to the world in Spanish. If you didn’t already know I’m Hispanic so this one was really interesting and fun to create. The record can be found on all major music streaming platforms. YES! Even Tidal…

What’s next?
Definitely expect an EP sometime in the fall. I like to keep my content current, so I won’t hold on to my music too long! I’m also working on collaborations with well-known overseas producers. Look out for my debut visuals as well and some of my own personalized merch!
RYEN-8

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Where can we find you?
Besides your local grocery store, you can find me on all major music streaming platforms and on Instagram and Twitter as @ThisIsRYEN.
P.S. Click for Ryen’s Instagram, his photographer Luis, and here to see the photo that first caught our eye!

By Maddie Berger | 2018.6.7

Calico Cat Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Rainbow Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Puff World Travel Club Jacket

This jacket has been inspected for major defects, but nromal vintage wear should be expected. Any specific condition notes are listed under the product details. This jacket is a vintage one-of-a-kind item, so sizing may vary significantly from what you expect. Tag size is listed for your convenience, but please note the chest width and front length measurements to ensure an accurate fit. Measurements are taken with the jacket laying flat.

World Cup ’94 T-Shirt

Size and condition notes: there is some light staining on the front and back, and a small mark on the right shoulder.

Rag Stock Co. Has Mukluks, Shoes

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“Rag Stock Co. Has Mukluks, Shoes”

By Dave Zunker, St. Cloud Times Staff Writer

Saturday, October 22, 1977

When you’re fresh out of mukluks, where do you go? When your Greco-Roman wrestling shoes are holier than thou, where do you get a new pair? And when there’s a rip in your silky skin diver long underwear, where can you purchase replacement parts?

The answer, mukluk hunters, is Minneapolis Rag Stock Co., a fresh business face on the Mall Germain located in the downtown district between St. Cloud Floral and Al’s Music at 510 Mall Germain.

But it’s not a business which features the freakish at the expense of the more practical. In fact, quite the contrary.

Rag Stock combines the variety of a rummage sale with the environmental conscience of the recycling movement and the economics of purchasing used items at a significant savings. It sells old clothes, used jeans, used long underwear, coats, lace tablecloths and more. And like Goodwill Industries and the Salvation Army, Rag Stock takes trade-ins.

St. Cloud’s Rag Stock is a spin-off from the mother store in Minneapolis and is part of a 10-store expansion which Howard Weisskopf began two years ago.

Hutchinson was the first out-state store opened. A store in Northfield followed: on Sept. 1, the St. Cloud store opened, as did a store in River Falls, Wis.

Scott Luers, sales and marketing director for the stores, says that further expansion is planned for Menomonie, Wis, Duluth, Mankato, and Willmar. He said the company is always looking for new places to open stores. The first consideration in that respect is whether the community has colleges located in the surrounding area.

“Success of the stores is guaranteed,” Luers said. “It’s a trend; sure it is. People just can’t afford to spend $60 for a pair of pants. But it’s important to have schools in the area because it’s kind of a young idea.”

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 Nancy Triebel, manager of the St. Cloud store, said that she was prepared for a significant influx of college students into the store when it opened a month and a half ago. But she says that she was surprised by the clientele.

“We found that families were coming in and we were kind of surprised,” Triebel said. “And we had repeat business sooner than we thought. After only a month and a half, we already have regular customers.”

Triebel says that people are not coming into the store for the atmosphere, although she and the assistant manager Joan Sigler try to make it as pleasant as possible.

It’s like a huge rummage sale,” Triebel says. We have the funky stuff like the body capes and the RAF underpants but there is also the practical stuff—the wools, the natural fibers, the storm coats.”

Some people come in for the quick tour around the store. Most take their time and price items and that is the primary reason the store is termed by both Luers and Triebel as a success, even at its early stage. Prices attract. Jeans at the store start at $1.98 for used and go to $8 for factory seconds.

Childrens clothes are priced at 35 cents to $1 for used clothes. Triebel says that the people who buy the clothes for children don’t seem to consider it an affront to their economic standing that they’re buying second-hand clothes.

Luers said that one of the biggest selling lines of clothing in the store is military coats, pants, uniforms, and caps.

“if the army can do one thing,” Luers said, “it’s make clothes. They make beautiful clothes and they use very fine materials.”

Luers claims that the Rag Stock stores are not seeking to compete with the Herbergers, Fandels or Daytons in the area. Neither, he says, are the stores considering themselves as competitors for Good Will or the Salvation Army or stores like the Next to New Shop in St. Cloud

And the rumors about the company selling rags to foreign countries often border on what Luers says is the absurd.

“There was a rumor that Minneapolis Rag Stock had sold a bunch of old Minneapolis South High School band uniforms to an army in Africa,” Luers said. “Ridiculous.”

 

Zunker, D. (1977, October 22). Rag Stock Co. Has Mukluks, Shoes The St. Cloud Times. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/

Pastel Coral Pink 90s Jacket 18030

Size and condition notes: Jacket is in very good vintage condition. Patterned stripes and polka dots interact with a nice peekaboo kick pleat in the back.

Angel Baby Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Love Letter Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Red Heart Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

BYE Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Alien Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Devil Baby Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Diamond Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Polaroid Sticker Patch

Content + Care
– Embroidered Patch
– Peel and stick backing

 

Size + Fit
– Measures 1″ x 1″

Walt Disney World 2016 Tie Dye Tee

Size and condition notes: actual size is unknown because the original tag is missing or unreadable. Size has been estimated based on the measurements.